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Un Lock Sitecore admin account

There are times when you
- Upgrade Sitecore locally
- Restore databases in your local Sitecore instance.

And you are no longer able to login to the Sitecore admin interface with the default admin username and password b.

When this happens you can unlock the Sitecore admin account and reset the password back to b.

To do this copy this aspx file to your Website\sitecore\admin folder (and overwrite existing file)

Next make sure your local web.config (in the root Website) folder has the following settings
minRequiredPasswordLength="1"
minRequiredNonalphanumericCharacters="0"

Lastly go to the following page
https://YourSitecore.com/sitecore/admin/unlock_admin.aspx



And click the Unlock Administrator button.
That's it, you can now login to your local Sitecore instance.
Happy Sitecoreing!



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